Annapolis MD mom was at heart of medical marijuana reform

In the fight to gain access to medical marijuana for her 4-year-old son, Logan, who suffers up to 10 seizures a day because of epilepsy, Gail Rand put herself at the heart of the debate.

In the fight to gain access to medical marijuana for her 4-year-old son, Logan, who suffers up to 10 seizures a day because of epilepsy, Gail Rand put herself at the heart of the debate.

Expanding Maryland‘s fledgling law on medical marijuana proved to be one of the key issues of the just-completed General Assembly session, and an Annapolis mother proved to be a key player in the reform bill that passed the House and Senate.

In the fight to gain access to medical marijuana for her 4-year-old son, Logan, who suffers up to 10 seizures a day because of epilepsy, Gail Rand put herself at the heart of the debate, starting at the opening gavel of the 90-day session when she was on hand to lobby House Speaker Michael E. Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller.

“It was a pretty powerful part of the last couple months for me,” Rand said of the assembly session.

Legislators passed a medical marijuana bill that effectively overrides last year’s failed program. The state’s earlier effort approved distribution of the drug through medical centers conducting research, but regulations were never approved and no such centers came forward to participate.

This year’s law, instead of relying on academic institutions to administer the drug, will allow for private growers and dispensaries. The program will be overseen by the state’s medical marijuana commission.  Read more here.

Enterprising Marijuana Moms Balance Cannabis Career And Family

Brittany Driver is a marijuana critic and “Pot and Parenting” columnist for the Denver Post’s marijuana website, The Cannabist. As part of her job responsibilities, Brittany tests different strains of marijuana and writes knowledgeable and experiential reviews to provide the reader with an unbiased critique. Brittany also writes a “Pot and Parenting” column in which she details what it’s like to be a marijuana-using parent in hopes of providing insight for those who might have a skewed view on what a pot smoker truly is. This all comes second of course to her favorite job as a stay-at-home mom to her 2-year-old son.

BrittanyDriverAndSon

Four more moms share their stories in the slideshow here:

Keeping The Faith

washingtonhempBy Sandy Thompson Soderberg

I have faith. I have faith in myself. I have faith in people. I have faith that people want to be educated with truth. Unfortunately, most people have been educated in a system that doesn’t always teach truth.

You may have read my last article. For those that didn’t, here’s a brief synopsis and the follow up about mine and my child’s experience when my child’s teacher asked her “does your mother smoke a lot of marijuana?” based on my political posts on Facebook regarding hemp.  I spoke to the teacher as well as the principal the day after the incident. Both were very open to talking as well as meeting to discuss the situation. Continue reading

Does medical marijuana equal bad parenting?

By Stephanie Smith, CNN
Shawnee Anderson's son, Sage, was removed from his parents' custody and spent 12 days in foster care.
 Shawnee Anderson’s son, Sage, was removed from his parents’ custody and spent 12 days in foster care.

Shawnee Anderson’s voice is shrill, quavering — on the edge of desperate. She clutches her 11-month-old son, Sage, while trying to comprehend the situation unfolding in front of her.

Her boyfriend — Sage’s father, Aaron Hillyer — is in handcuffs.

“Why are you doing this?” she pleads with police officers standing on the lawn outside her home.

“Your baby doesn’t need to be subjected to marijuana,” an officer replies, in an audio recording made by Anderson on her cell phone. Continue reading

‘Mommy lobby’ emerges as a powerful advocate for medical marijuana for children

Courtesy of Paige Figi – Charlotte Figi and her mom, Paige, on a family trip in 2013

By 

Standing in a Wisconsin State Capitol hearing room surrounded by parents hugging their seriously ill children, Sally Schaeffer began to cry as she talked about her daughter.Born with a rare chromosomal disorder, 6-year-old Lydia suffers from life-threatening seizures that doctors haven’t been able to control despite countless medications. The family’s last hope: medical marijuana. Continue reading

When they ask you what pot is in school, you tell them it’s something you cook with.

One of her teachers approached her that day, based on my political posts on Facebook and asked my 6th grader, “Does your mom smoke a lot of marijuana?”

One of her teachers approached her that day, based on my political posts on Facebook and asked my 6th grader, “Does your mom smoke a lot of marijuana?”

By Sandy Thompson Soderberg

Now while it is true, a pot is something you cook with, this is not what I was being talked to about. It was the early 80’s and the agenda in schools was to “educate” kids about drugs through a program called D.A.R.E. When my folks heard about this coming to the schools, that the local law enforcement was going to be in our schools telling kids LIES about cannabis, bringing in pipes and bongs asking if kids knew what they were, asking kids point blank if their parents used marijuana, well, I was told to lie. And this created fear in and of itself. Was I supposed to lie to the people meant to protect us? Yep. Because we live in a contradictory society that has brainwashed people.

Fast forward 30 years and now I’m a parent.

I’m not going to lie to my kids. From the time they were born, I have talked to my children like people.  I did not make things up to serve my purpose, but simply provided them with facts based on truth. From science to personal experience. When it comes to the talks about drugs, I repeatedly express to them the importance of people making sure their bodies and minds develop before they partake in ANY mind-altering substance. And that pharmaceuticals are some of the most dangerous substances out there. Continue reading

Denver Post’s First Marijuana Advice Columnist Q&A with Lady Cannabis of mainstream news media

Tawnee Lynne Cowan

We spoke with Susan Squibb, new marijuana advice columnist of The Denver Post, on the eve of Colorado legalizing the recreational use of the drug.

Tell us about your new job as the marijuana advice columnist with The Denver Post.

It’s a freelance position, starting in January. For the past year, I have been writing a marijuana manners column, “Ask Lady Cannabis,” for The Hemp Connoisseur.

What are your major duties in this role?

I will write a weekly column answering questions related to marijuana use, appropriate social use and changing cannabis laws and regulations. The challenge is keeping current with the social reality and the local ordinances that are guiding this societal transition from marijuana consumption being an illegal activity to being legally recognized.

What kind of training and background best prepares someone considering a career in legal cannabis?

The legal cannabis world has an increasing number of career opportunities. Now that the largest cash crop in America is legal, every profession is needed. Lawyers are needed to know the intricate laws and regulations and guide businesses in compliance. Service industries for building warehouse production, kitchens and dispensaries. HVAC, plumbing, electrical, and security systems are in high demand. Horticulture specialists, soil and hydroponic growers, crews of trimmers are needed to process the flowers. Chemists and lab techs are needed in emerging lab-testing facilities. Sales and marketing positions are needed, and I expect to see agricultural markets and commodities trading, and industrial Hemp develop in the next few years.

read the rest of the interview here.